Trout Unlimited Youth Fly Fishing Camp

Applications are now being accepted for this years Youth Fly Fishing camp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The annual fly fishing camp is now accepting applications for this year’s annual event. The camp will be held on June 25-29, 2017 and will be based from the Ralph A. MacMullan Conference Center on north shores of Higgins Lake in Roscommon, Michigan. The camp is open to boys and girls ages 12-16 years old, who will become our next generation of conservation leaders and anglers. You don’t need to be a great angler or have any knowledge of conservation issues, what you do need is a love for the out of doors and a willingness to learn. The highlights of the camp will be: Learning how to cast a fly rod, fly tying, proper catch & release, canoe trip, fishing the AuSable and Manistee Rivers, river restoration project and many more interesting things during the four day camp. The Adams Chapter of Traverse City will be sponsoring three young campers to this year camp, so don’t delay, application deadline is May 31, 2017 with no exceptions.

More information and the Application can be found under the “Events” tab – “MI TU Youth Fly Fishing Camp”.

Welcome to the Adams Chapter of Trout Unlimited

Featured

 

THE ADAMS CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED IS DEDICATED TO CONSERVING, PROTECTING, AND RESTORING OUR NORTHWEST MICHIGAN RIVERS

 

1b_b29460_t11.jpg Thank you for visiting The Adams Chapter website. If you are a frequent visitor, welcome back.

 If you are a first time visitor or new to the area please browse through our site. There is a lot of good information on our chapter and what we are doing. Please check back often for updates and coming events.

 If you are a visiting fly-fisher, you might want to check out the “Our Rivers” tab which will have information on the rivers in our district including the Boardman River, Platte River, and the Betsie River. It also includes information on some rivers close to us including the AuSable and Manistee Rivers. You may also want to check out our links on the “Our Links” Tab. Here you can find links to the DNR fishing reports for our area; Maps of inland lakes in Michigan; links to Fly Fishing shops and other clubs businesses in our area.

 But most of all, Enjoy your visit with us.

New Arctic Grayling Initiative Could Bring Historical Species Back to Michigan’s Waters

New Arctic grayling initiative could bring historical species back to Michigan’s waters

Michigan DNR June 9 2016

Michigan Department of Natural Resources, in partnership with the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, has announced a proposed initiative that aims to bring back an extirpated species to the state – Arctic Grayling.

The proposed initiative, announced at today’s Natural Resources meeting in Gaylord, will seek to establish self-sustaining populations of Arctic grayling throughout its historical range. The initiative is aproposed objective in the DNR’s 2017 Inland Trout Management Plan, which currently is being drafted.

(Read more…)

Invasive New Zealand Mudsnails Detected in East Branch Au Sable River

Invasive New Zealand Mudsnails detected in east branch Au Sable River

Michigan DNR June 9, 2016

The DEQ and DNR recently received reports from Grand Valley State University confirming populations of invasive New Zealand Mudsnails in the east branch of the Au Sable River near Grayling Michigan.

New Zealand Mudsnails are considered an invasive species and are listed as a Prohibited Species in Michigan. These snails are only about 1/8 of an inch long and can be difficult to see. However, they often cluster in high densities and compete with native snails and other macroinvertebrates for food and space. Originally from New Zealand, the snails are now widespread in many western states and present in Wisconsin. They are easily transported and resilient, and can survive in damp environments for up to 26 days. Where established, these snails can dominate the bottoms of rivers and streams and exhibit invasive qualities, outcompeting and displacing macroinvertebrates that are vital as food sources for many fish species. In addition, these invasive snails have no nutritional value for fish.

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